• Boston's Two Veterans Day Parades

    Boston's first Veterans Day Parade, kicks off at 1pm on November 11 at the corner of Boylston and Tremont Streets. 

    The second Veterans Day Parade, known as the Veterans for Peace Parade, follows right behind the first parade to honor and celebrate the original intention for Armistice Day - a Day of Peace.   Check November Calendar for parade start time and date updates

    Both parades march around Boston Common along Boylston and Tremont Streets, and on to City Hall Plaza and the front of Faneuil Hall next to the statue of American Revolution patriot Samuel Adams, where you can hear a variety of speeches, anti-war poetry readings, and music. 

    Look for an assortment of military units, high school ROTC groups, honorary militias, marching bands, veterans' organizations, and - since this is Boston where we proudly carry our traditions forward - debate and dissent. 

    The Suffolk County Council/District 7 of the American Legion coordinates the parade with the city.  For more information:  (617) 303-5693

    FROM: Boston's Discovery Guide

    Veterans Day events Beyond Boston

    NORTH OF BOSTON

    The Salem Veterans Service Department will hold its annual Veterans Day Service at Salem High School on Sunday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. The ceremony will honor more than 40 Korean War veterans or their surviving family members. The veterans will be presented with the Ambassador for Peace medal from the Consulate General of Boston on behalf of the South Korean Government as a token of gratitude for their service during the war. The event is free and open to the public.

    The Patriotic Observance Committee of North Andover and Boxford will begin its Veterans Day Parade on Sunday, Nov. 11, at 10:15 a.m. The parade route begins across from North Andover Town Hall and continues down Main Street. A service will be held at Patriots Park. The descendants of three World War I veterans will be recognized along with local veterans.

    The towns of Rockport and Gloucester will honor its veterans with a ceremony, parade, and luncheon on Sunday, Nov. 11. The ceremony will begin at 9 a.m. at the Gloucester High School Field House. After the ceremony, the parade will step off from the high school and continue to the World War I Memorial at American Legion Square for a wreath placing ceremony for WWI veterans. After the ceremony, American Legion Post #3 will host a luncheon, free and open to the public, with entertainment.

    The Malden Public Library and Malden Historical Society will commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I with an exhibition of local artifacts from the time period. The exhibition, called “War and Remembrance: Malden in the Great War,” will display wartime posters, photographs, letters, clothing, and equipment. The exhibit will run until Nov. 28 in the Malden Public Library Lower Art Gallery in the Converse Memorial Building at 36 Salem St. Visit maldenpubliclibrary.org.

     

    SOUTH OF BOSTON

    In Stoughton, a Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 9 at the middle school will honor local veterans and share stories of their sacrifices. The program will take place on Nov. 9 at the Dr. Robert G. O’Donnell Middle School at 211 Cushing St., Stoughton. The morning will begin with a breakfast for veterans and their families at 8 a.m. and continue with a program for students, staff, veterans, and their families at 9:30 a.m. Selected eighth-graders will introduce a veteran to the crowd and share the veteran’s story with students. If a veteran would like to participate in the program, please contact Assistant Principal David Guglia, Assistant Principal at 781-344-7002.

    Veterans Day in Hingham will include a breakfast for veterans, a wreath placing ceremony, and a speaking event. The morning will begin with a breakfast for veterans and their families at the Central Meeting Room in Town Hall from 8:30 to 10 a.m. At 10:55 a.m., the public is invited to gather in front of town hall at the Veteran’s Memorial for the ringing of the Bells of Peace and a wreath-placing ceremony. After the bells are rung in a nationwide tribute to veterans of World War I, the program will continue at 11:15 a.m. to the Sanborn Auditorium in Town Hall. There, Colonel Richard S. Smudin, an army combat veteran who served during Operation Iraqi Freedom, will speak.

    The Old Colony YMCA in Stoughton will host special programming in honor of Veterans Day on Nov. 12. Festivities at 445 Central St. begin at 8 a.m., when visitors can participate in a group fitness class called “Workout with a Veteran.” The “Appreciation Breakfast” begins at 9 a.m., and visitors are encouraged to leave messages of appreciation and signatures on the “Veterans Thank You Board.” The nonprofit will also give veterans a free week pass through Nov. 17. All programs are free. E-mail mricci@oldcolonyymca.org or call 508-897-1222.

    Veterans will be honored at the Brockton Senior Center on Nov. 13 at 9 a.m. The event at 10 Father Kenney Way will begin with a wreath-laying ceremony, followed by a breakfast and performance by Sergeant Daniel Clark, “The Singing Trooper.” Veterans can attend free of charge; the cost of admission is $5 for all others. Registration is required. Call 508-580-7811.

     

    WEST OF BOSTON

    The town of Lexington will celebrate Veterans Day with a parade and ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 11. The Lexington Historical Society, Lexington Minutemen, Veterans Association, and the Lexington Field and Garden Club collaborated with the Town Celebrations Committee, the Cary Memorial Library, and the Tourism Committee to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. Festivities begin at 11 a.m. with the ringing of town church bells to honor the signing of the Armistice. At 1:15 p.m. a parade will begin at the Lexington Police Station, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., and conclude at the Cary Hall, 1605 Massachusetts Ave. At 2 p.m., the World War I Commemoration Committee will host the Grand Remembrance ceremony in the Isaac Harris Cary Memorial Hall at Cary Hall. Visit www.lexingtonma.gov.

    The public can experience the history of Camp Devens and enjoy special programing celebrating veterans. Fort Devens Museum will host an open house celebrating the Veterans of the US Armed Forces on Saturday, Nov. 10. The museum, at 94 Jackson Road, will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum will host a lecture in honor of the 243d birthday of the United States Marine Corps at 11 a.m. Linda Hixon, an adjunct instructor at Worcester State University, will showcase her research on Worcester World War I soldiers at 12:30 p.m. All programs are free. Call 978-772-1286 or e-mail info@fortdevensmuseum.org.

    Marlborough’s Veterans Day parade on Sunday, Nov. 11, begins at 10 a.m. at the American Legion at 90 Maple St. and will conclude at the World War I Memorial, called The Doughboy Monument. Stops will be made along the way at memorials honoring veterans. Kylt Toto, community outreach officer at the US Department of Veterans Affairs, will speak about the health issues veterans face. Parking is available at St. Mary’s Credit Union, 133 South Bolton St. Visit www.marlborough-ma.gov.

    The city of Framingham will host a Veterans Day Observance Ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 11, to honor local veterans. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m. in Nevins Hall of the Memorial Building, 150 Concord St. Eight Massachusetts Medals of Liberty will be awarded to the families of World War I and World War II veterans who were killed in action. Jacki Wolf, a US Navy veteran and coordinator of veterans services at Framingham State University, will speak at the event. Visit www.framinghamma.gov.

    Arlington’s Department of Veterans’ Services will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I on Sunday, Nov. 11. The parade begins at 10:30 a.m. at Walgreens Pharmacy, 1425 Massachusetts Ave., and will end at the Arlington Fire Department, 411 Massachusetts Ave. The ceremony will begin inside the fire station, and conclude with a wreath-laying ceremony at Monument Square, adjacent to the fire station. Visit www.arlingtonma.gov.

     

    From: The Boston Globe