• SY 2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio

    for STEM and Literacy

     

    Service Categories

    Organizations seeking to be considered for the SY 2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio must provide programming or services in at least one of the following service categories:

    1. Literacy
    2. STEM
      1. Science
      2. Technology
      3. Engineering (including Computer Science)
      4. Mathematics

    To submit your Intent to Apply now, click here.

    Literacy

    For the purposes of the SY 2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio, proposed literacy programs must serve BPS students in research and evidence-based literacy, skills, and enrichment processes that will:

    1. motivate and engage students toward literacy development
    2. minimize learning loss and increase academic achievement
    3. develop student socio-emotional skills and increase student efficacy by building skills and competencies
    4. strengthen the effectiveness of school-community partnerships.

    Literacy programming should be aligned with the literacy standards at the end of the 2017 English Language Arts and Literacy Framework.

    Examples of eligible literacy programs include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Programs that build on the culturally and linguistically diverse strengths of our students
    • Programs that allow students to view literacy as a source of enjoyment and introduce students to the power and pleasure of literacy.
    • Programs that draw on literature and informational texts to develop students’ understanding of their own literary heritage and culture.
    • Programs that build on the language, experiences, knowledge, and interest that students bring to school.
    • Programs that prepare students to be critical thinkers
    • Programs that prepare students to explore socio-cultural frameworks, concepts of culture, and social capital.
    • Programs that meaningfully prepare students for success on high stakes assessment.
    • Programs that provide professional development support to teachers as they address the standards in the 2017 English Language Arts and Literacy Framework in ways that meet the needs of our students.

    What does it mean to provide evidence-based literacy programming?

    In the Boston Public Schools, our goal is to leverage students’ everyday literacy and language practices to teach literacy and language practices (Lee, 2007; Levine, 2014; Meier 2008; Rainey, 2016). Children develop concepts of reading and writing early in life. Yet, the ability to read and write does not develop without careful planning and instruction (Adams, 1994; Chall, 1990; Juel, 1988; Ehri, 1999). Although research has established that no one method works for all, approaches that favor systematic code instruction and meaningful connected reading provide superior progress in reading.

    Literacy is defined “as the process of using reading, writing, and oral language to extract, construct and critique meaning through interactions and involvement with multimodal texts in the context of socially situated texts“ (Frankel, Becker, Rowe, & Pearson 2016).

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    STEM

    For the SY 2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio, School-Community Partners applying to the STEM service category must provide programming in one of the following sub-categories: science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM).

    More information about the eligibility requirements for each STEM sub-category can be found below.

    Science

    For the purposes of the SY 2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio Invitation, science programming should be aligned with the MA 2016 Science and Technology/Engineering Curriculum Framework. These programs should:

    1. strengthen student engagement in science
    2. contribute to the development of a strong science identity
    3. allow students the opportunity to make sense of scientific phenomena by engaging in the science and engineering practices.

    Science and engineering practices include the skills necessary to engage in scientific inquiry and engineering design. It is necessary to teach these so students develop an understanding and facility with the practices in appropriate contexts. The Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC, 2012) identifies eight essential science and engineering practices:

    • Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering).
    • Developing and using models.
    • Planning and carrying out investigations.
    • Analyzing and interpreting data.
    • Using mathematics and computational thinking.
    • Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering).
    • Engaging in argument from evidence.
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

    Examples of program types include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Programs that provide students with support for the developing their conceptual understanding in science, technology/engineering by integrating content and practices
    • Programs that integrate culturally sustaining practices and align with district-recommended science curricula
    • Programs that expose students to college and career readiness in different science disciplines
    • Programs that provide opportunities for students to solve complex real-world problems and apply scientific reasoning
    • Programs that integrate hands-on experiential learning through project-based or placed-based learning in science
    • Programs that provide professional development support to teachers as they address the standards and practices in the 2016 Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Curriculum Framework.

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    Technology (including Computer Science)

    For the purposes of the SY2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio Invitation, the technology/computer science category is for programming that is aligned with the 2016 Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science (DLCS) Curriculum Framework.  These programs should:

    1. be designed to challenge students in multiple ways
    2. build upon curiosity and prior knowledge and enable students to solve progressively deeper, broader, and more sophisticated problems
    3. generate active classroom talk
    4. lead to an understanding of the necessity for digital literacy and computer science reasoning

    Examples of program types include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Coding & Computational Thinking, App and Game development
    • 3D Modeling (CAD), Multimedia, Digital Media
    • Programs to expose students to advanced technology such as virtual reality or drones
    • Digital Citizenship & Cyber Safety

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    Engineering

    For the purposes of the SY2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio Invitation, the engineering category is for programming that is aligned with the ETS (Technology/Engineering) standards within the 2016 Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Curriculum Framework. These program should:

    1. instill wonder in students about the world around them through engaging and exciting learning experiences.
    2. Allow students to develop a passion about the natural and designed world and model the inquisitive, analytical, and skeptical nature of science.
    3. offer curriculum that includes thoughtful hands-on and minds-on activities, laboratories, investigations, and design challenges.

    Science and engineering practices include the skills necessary to engage in scientific inquiry and engineering design. It is necessary to teach these skills so students develop an understanding and facility with the practices in appropriate contexts. The Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC, 2012) identifies eight essential science and engineering practices:

    • Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering).
    • Developing and using models.
    • Planning and carrying out investigations.
    • Analyzing and interpreting data.
    • Using mathematics and computational thinking.
    • Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering).
    • Engaging in argument from evidence.
    • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

    (Page 97 in 2016 MA Science & Technology/Engineering Curriculum Framework).

    Examples of program types include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Programs that engage students in problem solving, including those that do not rely on technology, science, or math (i.e., solving community issues)
    • Robotics
    • Programs that utilize physical computing (i.e., wearable tech, microprocessors programming, etc)
    • Makerspace programs
    • Digital fabrication including 3D modeling and printing, laser cutting, etc.
    • Other hands-on fabrication such as woodworking, sewing, etc.

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    Mathematics

    For the purposes of the SY2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio Invitation, the mathematics category is for programming that is aligned with the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. These programs should:

    1. strengthen student engagement in mathematics
    2. contribute to the development of a strong mathematics identity
    3. allow students to experience the joy and satisfaction of working with rich non-routine mathematics problems and tasks

    Some of these problems and tasks may address real world problems of importance, issues of social justice, or questions that are of mathematical importance. Examples of program types include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Programs that prepare students for more rigorous mathematics content
    • Programs that provide students with support for the development of their understanding of mathematics content that lays the foundation for procedural fluency.
    • Programs that provide opportunities for students to mathematize situations of interest in their environment.
    • Programs that meaningfully prepare students for success on high stakes assessment.
    • Programs that provide professional development support to teachers as they address the standards and practices in the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Mathematics for Mathematics in ways that meet the needs of their students.

    What does it mean to do Mathematics?

    Mathematics for the purposes of the SY2019-20 Opportunity Portfolio encompasses all content and practice standards addressed by the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics or content and practices the reflect more advanced material that prepares students for success in credit-bearing post-secondary mathematics coursework.

    The Mathematically Proficient Person of the Twenty-First Century

    “The standards describe a vision of what it means to be a mathematically proficient person in this century. Students who are college and career ready in mathematics will at a minimum demonstrate the academic knowledge, skills, and practices necessary to enter into and succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing courses in College Algebra, Introductory College Statistics, or technical courses. It also extends to a comparable entry-level course or a certificate or workplace training program requiring an equivalent level of mathematics. At the same time, the standards provide for a course of study that will prepare students for science, technology, engineering, or mathematics career. For example, the level of mathematics preparation necessary to succeed in an engineering program is more ambitious than the preparation needed to succeed in an entry-level, credit-bearing mathematics course as part of a liberal arts program. The standards provide pathways for students who want to pursue a mathematics-intensive career or academic major after high school.” (page 9 of the 2017 MA Curriculum Framework)

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