• II-B-1: Safe Learning Environment
    Unsatisfactory
    Needs Improvement
    Proficient
    Exemplary
    Maintains a physical environment that is unsafe or does not support student learning. Uses inappropriate or ineffective rituals, routines, and/or responses to reinforce positive behavior or respond to behaviors that interfere with students' learning. May create and maintain a safe physical environment but inconsistently maintains rituals, routines, and responses needed to prevent and/or stop behaviors that interfere with all students' learning. Uses rituals, routines, and appropriate responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and most behaviors that interfere with learning are prevented. Uses rituals, routines, and proactive responses that create and maintain a safe physical and intellectual environment where students take academic risks and play an active role—individually and collectively—in preventing behaviors that interfere with learning. Is able to model this element.
    Coming Soon
    What instructional practices should be observed? What student impacts should be expected?
    For TEACHERS this may look like.
    1. Teacher allows the classroom to be cluttered, uncomfortable, or dangerous, students have limited access to learning activities.

    1. Teacher physically arranges the classroom so that clutter is minimized, pathways are clear, and most students have unobstructed access to learning materials.

    1. Teacher physically arranges the classroom to support the instructional goals and learning activities, and all students have unobstructed access to learning materials.

    1. Teacher physically arranges the classroom in complete alignment with the learning activities such that all students have unobstructed access to learning materials.

    1. Teacher does not use clear procedures for getting students' attention, managing transitions, or the distribution and collection of materials.

    1. Teacher uses established procedures for getting students' attention, managing transitions, or the distribution and collection of materials, but they do not function smoothly.

    1. Teacher uses established effective and smooth procedures for getting students' attention, managing transitions, and distributing/collecting materials.

    1. Teacher uses established routines that gradually transfer responsibility for smooth transitions and procedures to students.

    1. Teacher addresses students in a disrespectful or unfriendly manner and fails to address disrespectful interactions between students.

    1. Teacher attempts to promote respectful interactions between teacher and students, and among students, but with occasional disrespect or insensitivity.

    1. Teacher ensures that interactions with and among students are uniformly respectful.

    1. Teacher ensures that interactions with and among students are kind, supportive, and respectful.

    1. Teacher does not monitor student behavior, enforce standards of conduct, or respond effectively to disruptions.

    1. Teacher sometimes attempts to maintain order in the classroom, but often responds inconsistently to similar student misbehaviors sometimes harsh, other times lenient.

    1. Teacher frequently monitors behavior in accordance with established standards of conduct, reinforcing positive behavior and responding consistently and effectively to inappropriate behavior.

    1. Teacher monitors behavior quietly and subtly, reinforcing positive academic effort and responding quickly to any inappropriate behavior.

    1. Teacher creates an intellectual environment where only a few students are encouraged to attempt challenging tasks.

    1. Teacher creates an intellectual environment where only some students are encouraged to attempt challenging tasks.

    1. Teacher creates an intellectual environment where students take academic risks by attempting challenging tasks.

    1. Teacher creates an intellectual environment where students take academic risks by attempting challenging tasks.

    As a result, the IMPACT on STUDENTS may be...
    1. If asked, students are unable to describe classroom procedures, and instructional time is lost because students do not follow procedures.

    1. If asked, students are unable to fully describe classroom procedures, or students inconsistently follow procedures.

    1. Students generally follow procedures with minimal prompting from the teacher.

    1. Students consistently follow all classroom routines and procedures without prompting from the teacher.

    1. Students are often disruptive or disrespectful to the teacher and/or each other.

    1. Students are occasionally disruptive or disrespectful to the teacher and/or each other.

    1. Students are rarely disruptive and use a respectful tone to address peers and the teacher.

    1. Students consistently behave appropriately and use a respectful tone to address peers and the teacher.

     
    1. Students participate only if called on, and are often hesitant to offer their ideas in front of classmates.

    1. The majority of students participate willingly; however, some students appear to be somewhat hesitant to offer their ideas in front of classmates.

    1. Nearly all students participate frequently; there is no indication that students limit participation due to fears of being mocked

    Name Description Type
    Ms. Manning, Fenway High School
    Algebra I
    Mixed High School 
     
     Ms. Manning leads students through solving equations with basic moves, demonstrating a positive learning environment along the way.   Manning
    Short videos on various Student Engagement and Classroom Management strategies Edweek wrote an article sharing some of the best Teaching Channel videos on Student Engagement and Classroom Management strategies. The strategies are short and easy to implement in the classroom. Video
    "Precise Praise" from the Teach Like a Champion site This video from the Teach Like a Champion site demonstrates and discusses how to give strategic praise to reinforce positive behavior. Video
         
    Coming Soon
    Resource Name Description Resource Type
    The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher - Harry K. Wong Section C is on Classroom Management and includes how to assign seating, start class effectively, take roll, keep a grading system, have a discipline plan, and set up classroom procedures. Book
    The First-Year Teacher's Survival Guide: Ready-to-Use Strategies, Tools and Activities for Meeting the Challenges of Each School Day (J-B Ed: Survival Guides) - Julia G. Thompson Section V is on how to Maintain an Orderly Environment:
    • Prevent Discipline Problems
    • Manage Discipline Problems
    • Learn to Solve Classroom Problems
    Book
    Assertive Discipline: Positive Behavior Management for Today's Classroom - Lee Canter Advice on classroom management, discipline, behavior management cycle, and reducing disruptive behavior Book
    Teach Like a Champion – Doug Lemov

    Chapter 5 - Creating a Strong Classroom Culture

    Additional Resources

    Book
    Teach Like a Champion – Doug Lemov Chapter 7: Building Character and Trust Book
    The First Six Weeks of School – Paula Denton and Roxann Kriete A responsive classroom book about how to develop a positive, safe, self-directed classroom community in the first 6 weeks (K-6) Book
    Reluctant Disciplinarian: Advice on Classroom Management from a Softy Who Became (Eventually) a Successful Teacher (Teaching Skills Techniques) - Gary Rubinstein What does and does not work in classroom management, advice from real teachers Book
    Cooperative Discipline – Linda Albert Effective behavior interventions, developing a classroom climate, preventing violence, dealing with angry/aggressive students, conflict resolution, teaching students to evaluate their own behavior Book
    Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports

    Click on a student behavior that you are observing and it shows interventions for that type of misbehavior, including, why, when, and how you should do each intervention.

    how to use non-verbal cues to manage the classroom and establish routines and procedures

    many samples of behavior contracts and how/when to use different types

    Website
    Open Circle Curriculum Open Circle's programming focuses on two goals: strengthening students' SEL skills related to self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, interpersonal relationships and problem-solving; and fostering safe, caring and highly-engaging classroom and school communities. Professional Development
    Crisis Prevention and Intervention (CPI) Training Sign up for training and consulting in nonviolent crisis intervention. Professional Development
    Exemplar Management Plan A resource with examples for how to set up rewards and consequences systems, behavioral expectations, classroom procedures, and behavior tracking worksheets. Guidance Document
    Using Math Centers A guide including how to set up centers in the classroom (different options), monitor behavior at centers in a positive way, keep track of student work at centers , and differentiate through centers. Guidance Document
    Classroom Culture Building Activities A guide with getting-to-know-you games, classroom jobs, and incentive systems. Guidance Document
    Class Procedures Sample classroom procedures (entering and exiting, returning work, missing work, etc). Guidance Document
    Do you have a resource that you want to recommend for this element? Email us at eval@bostonpublicschools.org with the subject line "Interactive Rubric Resource Recommendation" in the email