• I-C-1: Analysis and Conclusions
    Unsatisfactory
    Needs Improvement
    Proficient
    Exemplary
    Does not draw conclusions from student data beyond completing minimal requirements such as grading for report cards Draws conclusions from a limited analysis of student data to inform student grading and promotion decisions. Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data to improve student learning. Individually and with colleagues, draws appropriate, actionable conclusions from a thorough analysis of a wide range of assessment data that improve short- and long-term instructional decisions. Is able to model this element.
    Coming Soon
    What instructional practices should be observed? What student impacts should be expected?
    For TEACHERS this may look like.
    1. Teacher uses only infrequent, required school-wide assessments to track students' knowledge and skills.

    1. Teacher uses limited assessment data to determine students' knowledge and skills.

    1. Teacher accurately determines students' knowledge and skills using multiple methods of assessment both during lessons and throughout units.  

    1. Teacher accurately determines students' knowledge and skills using multiple methods of assessment consistently during lessons and throughout units.

    1. Teacher uses only required school-wide assessments to determine student grading and promotion decisions.

    1. Teacher uses a limited record of students' progress on learning goals and relevant standards to determine student grading and promotion decisionsl.

    1. Teacher maintains a record of students' progress on learning goals and relevant standards measured on a wide variety of assessments and uses this data to inform student grading and promotion decision.

    1. Teacher maintains a record of students' progress on learning goals and relevant standards measured on a wide variety of assessments and uses this data to inform parental contact, student grading, discussions with colleagues, and promotion decisions.

     
    1. Teacher rarely conducts analyses of student errors, or only conducts analyses of student errors on unit tests or required school-wide assessments.

    1. Teacher, individually and with colleagues, conducts analyses of student errors from a wide range of assessment data to identify student strengths, confusions, misconceptions, and knowledge or skill gaps.

    1. Teacher, individually and with colleagues, frequently conducts analyses of student errors from a wide range of assessment data to identify student strengths, confusions, misconceptions, and knowledge or skill gaps.  

     
    1. Teacher rarely uses analyses of student errors to inform instruction.  

    1. Teacher, individually and with colleagues, uses analyses of student errors to reflect on instruction and make adjustments to practice during lessons and to plan and/or re-design future lessons.   

    1. Teacher, individually and with colleagues, consistently uses analyses of student errors to reflect on instruction and make adjustments to practice during lessons and to plan and/or re-design future lessons.  

     
    1. Teacher rarely uses analyses of student errors to provide interventions or enrichments to students.

    1. Teacher, individually and with colleagues, uses analyses of student errors to identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enrichments for students.  

    1. Teacher, individually and with colleagues, consistently uses analyses of student errors to identify and/or implement appropriate differentiated interventions and enrichments for students.

    As a result, the IMPACT on STUDENTS may be...
    1. Students do not conduct analyses of their own work or the work of peers.

    1. Students rarely conduct analyses of their own work or the work of peers.  

    1. Students frequently conduct analyses of their own work or the work of peers to reflect on strengths, confusions, misconceptions, and knowledge or skill gaps.  

    1. Students consistently conduct analyses of their own work and the work of peers, and provide specific and accurate feedback on strengths, confusions, misconceptions, and knowledge or skill gaps.

    Coming Soon
    Coming Soon
    Resource Name Description Type
    Embrace Action Research: Improve Classroom Practice and Tell the Story The blogpost describes how teachers can use action research to evaluate classroom practices. Includes resources for teachers who are interested further. Blog post
    Do you have a resource that you want to recommend for this element? Email us at eval@bostonpublicschools.org with the subject line "Interactive Rubric Resource Recommendation" in the email