Headlines & Features

  • Summer Learning

    Boston Public Schools students don’t often have a need to don Wellington Boots for class unless, however, they are among the nearly 90 kids who get to don a pair of “wellies” each morning before trudging through the salt marshes on Thompson Island – their outdoor classroom for the summer.

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  • The Brothers of Haynes ECC

    "The Haynes Early Education Center is an amazing school in Roxbury," said Malachi, who along with his four brothers attended and graduated from the Haynes ECC. "It was the foundation for my academic success." Malachi used to struggle with his speech, but thanks to his teachers, Ms. Mullen and Ms. Starx, he was able to receive the support he needed. "Speaking has become one of my strengths," said Malachi. In May, he put his speaking skills to the test during a meeting with President Obama, a forum for black and Latino boys that was held shortly after the Baltimore riots. During that gathering, Malachai left a strong impression on the president. Soon after meeting Malachi, President Obama referenced Malachi's remarks at a closed conference at Lehman College in the Bronx. President Obama told the group about the young man he had met. "Malachi, he just talked about — we should talk about love," the New York Times quoted Mr. Obama as saying.

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  • Free Summer Meals

    On July 8, 2015, Boston Public Schools kicked off its Summer Meal Program, which provides free meals to all children under the age of 19. Many neighborhood children, parents, and community partners joined the festivities at the Ann M. Cole Community Center in Jamaica Plain.

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  • 50th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act

    The Boston Public Schools would like to thank the Edward M. Kennedy Institution for extending an invitation to 20 of our high school students and 5 of our history teachers to attend a special celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. Congressman John Lewis of GA, the last surviving member of the "big six" leaders of the 1950's and 1960's civil rights movement, founder of SNCC, and organizer of the march at Selma, was the keynote speaker at the event. Our BPS students were treated to a small group discussion on the topic of race and justice with Congressman Lewis preceding the main event. The keynote address was delivered to a sold-out crowd of 600 attendees, including the MA congressional delegation and members of Boston's City Council. Our Boston Public Schools student attendees were given priority seating on the EMK Institute's senate floor, with many of them in the front row.

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  • Gates Scholar

    David Lopera, who graduated in June from the O'Bryant, learned of the Gates Millennium scholarship during his sophomore year when a friend received the same award. "Why not me?" thought David, who became determined to apply for the scholarship in his senior year. The Gates Millennium Scholarship is very competitive, requiring applicants to write eight essays, each on a different topic. David's essays focused on his Columbian upbringing and his parents, who were the driving force behind his success. "My parents always stressed the importance of education," David said. He also acknowledged his guidance counselor, Dr. Maria Irizarry, "She was a friend who believed in me. She worked closely with me during the application process and made sure I was on top of everything," he added.

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  • A-yo

    He once dreaded speaking in public, but Ayomide "A-yo" Olumuyima overcame his personal “stage fright” soon after joining the Boston School Committee as a high school junior -- a role that helped him turn his voice into a powerful symbol of youth-driven change that will long serve as a model for future student representatives.

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  • D-Day

    John Rogers has been a fourth-grade teacher at the Guild school for four years, and he loves it there. "I've even moved to this neighborhood and bought a house," said John. He enjoys the traditions of the school; one particular custom of the school is to have fourth-grade teachers prepare a curriculum that incorporates the teacher's favorite era in history. For Guild enthusiast John Rogers, the topic for his class lesson was a no-brainer.

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